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  • Braille Typography from creative director Deon Staffelbach

    Deon Staffelbach, a creative director and owner of a branding company, recently started researching whether visually impaired people get to experience unique typographical design and how typography translates to braille. He found out that only the standard braille ''dot'' was used in building, emergence and elevator signage. Books written in braille reminded him of lines of code , or old computer punchcards. No variation in the size of the dot, or its hight and variance. As long as the language patterns is correct, he figured that people could get the same message from a stylised shape while adding an extra level information, instead of the standard dot. Having in mind that it was possible to create a variety of embossed shapes, especially in cards, posters, building signage, he thought of embossing or a letterpress application. 

    His first concept is the braille font Constellation. He named it this way because of the patterns it makes when text is written out. He believes that a braille reader would hopefully find it interesting to touch a group of stars that form a line of text. Also, depending on the emboss on some words, they could act as light or bold faces. Using printing techniques like thermography, foils or varnishes would provide a tactile element of discovery. His other concepts include braille fonts called Pyramid, the classic braille dot, reshaped into a point using a pyramid and a font named Love with many uses that go beyond Valentines day. Wanting to give blind people the opportunity to enjoy body art like tattoos, he believes that these fonts are great for body modification and scarification.

     

    See the complete project here.

    Text and images taken from Deon Staffelbach's Behance account

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    21Feb
  • Hand Lettering by Graphic Designer Mateusz Witczak

    Mateusz Witczak is a self-taught Lettering Artist and Graphic Designer currently living in Warsaw, Poland.

    His specialization is hand drawn lettering and typography designs with high level of detail combined traditional methods and tools with the latest digital applications.

    Below, a collection of hand-drawn lettering & typography designs made in 2013 and beginning of 2014.

    See the complete portfolio here.

    Images taken from Mateusz Witczak's Behance account.

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    Hand Lettering by Mateusz Witczak
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    Hand Lettering by Mateusz Witczak
    17Jan
    Hand Lettering by Mateusz Witczak
  • Painted Typography by Design Director Craig Ward

    As Craig Ward, a Design Director known primarily for his pioneering typographic works says "It's an emotional time to be an Englishman". He began developing this expressive, textural, aggressive painted type style as a reaction to recent political events back home . His intial thought was "to take classic British design examples and mess them up as a social commentary - the classic Penguin book cover design; the new Scotland Yard logo etc". 

    As he was working, events in the USA conspired him to apply the same look to the Black Lives Matter slogan. "It's a look I'm hoping to develop further in time but thought now was a good time to park it" he adds.

    See his project here

    * Text and images taken from Craig Ward's Behance account.

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    Painted Typography by Craig Ward
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    Painted Typography by Craig Ward
    17Jan
    Painted Typography by Craig Ward
  • We are all migrants: Letters from America in the late 19th century

    From the mid-19th century to the outbreak of the Great War, 2.5 million inhabitants of the partitioned Poland left for the United States. In an effort to combat the wave of mass emigration, czarist authorities decided to “arrest” the letters sent by Poles overseas to their families. Thus, most of those epistles never reached their addressees. This volume, offering a selection of texts and reportages describing that phenomenon both in historical and contemporary contexts, constitutes a worthwhile complement and addendum to the exhibition under the same title.

    One the one hand, the simple and austere form of the books echoes the realities that emigrants at the time had to confront. On the other, the gold appearing on its spine metaphorically denotes the striving for a better tomorrow, promised by the “gold-bearing” America, while the typography has been inspired by the contemporary printed material. Also, throughout the volume, the reader will see elliptical forms which draw upon postmarks. The book comprises four parts, each of which is distinguished by a slightly different layout and a letter which describes it. The last part includes a photographic account of the exhibition, held in 2016 at the ZAMEK Culture Centre in Poznań.

    See the complete project here

    Text and images taken from Marcin Markowski's Behance account

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    We are all migrants
    17Jan
    We are all migrants
  • Bas van der Burgh invites you to send a data-message in a bottle

    "The concept is to give people the ability to send data through a bottled time capsule. The website allows the sender to follow his roving data, whereby the receiver can respond to the found message , says Bas van der Burgh on his  innovative yet nostalgic project. "The question is, how much do you value your own data in the age of cloud-computing, where every moment of your life is being stored and owned by large corporations? Which story do you want to keep or tell if datacenters go down?In search for these questions I give big data users the opportunity to romanticize their online storage with a old-fashioned way of communication," the 26 year old graphic designer from Rotterdam adds.

    "If you have your own bottle ready you just have to find the nearest spot to release your message. Use a ocean currents map to find out when it is ep, this way your bottle will flow towards the ocean. In case you have installed a GPS tracker you can make use of our tracking map to make sure your bottle is still a roving story."

    Explore more here

     

     

     

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    19Dec