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  • Matt Yerman’s Horrible Five and the type for blood on this Friday the 13th

    Matt Yerman, the Oakland-based designer and art director who loves to help brands tell their stories through digital experiences, has a thirst for blood and cool graphic design splattered with type. His project “Horrible Five” is a proof. “A harrowing collection of utterly disgusting clips. From serial slashers to blood-thirsty aliens, this arrangement tackles the best scenes from contemporary horror to vintage classics. "Blood & gore is fun, right?” notes the designer of his project. “I’ve been collecting images of old VHS box covers and a lot horror-related imagery for years, so it was fun to pull it all out and explore different interpretations for the logo. I’m absolutely in love with hand-drawn type and there were some extremely iconic pieces from the 50s – 90s that inspired the other versions below” he adds on this bloody party of five that is ideal for viewing any Friday the 13th.

    Enter at your own risk here.

    Credits: mattyerman.com

    13Jul
  • From London to Texas: Sawdust latest typographic identity for Texas Monthly is genius

    The highly acclaimed duo of creatives Sawdust aka Jonathan Quainton and Rob Gonzalez are the Houdinis of type.

    Known globally for creating over-the-edge, awe infusing brand identities for numerous premium clients (NYT, The Coca-Cola Company, Hearst, Conde Nast, ESPN, Nike, Audi, Honda, IBM to name a few) this multi-awarded duo are in love with type. Sawdust specialise in “bespoke and innovative typography, brand display typefaces, visual identities and image-creation”.

    Their latest fresh typographic identity for Texas Monthly is a new entry in Sawdust’s stunning portfolio of typographic manilulations.

    Sawdust crafted a new look for the near-half-century-old publication Texas Monthly. The London-based studio bespoke typography for the magazine’s new lifestyle sections is created in conjunction with TM’s recent magazine and website redesign. Sawdust invest on large drop caps and new 3D effect contents title lettering for a fresh and sharp redesign to adore.

    Check more here


    Photos: Sawdust | www.madebysawdust.co.uk

    11Jul
  • Sunday screening: From paper to screen, the evolution of typography explained

    Typography is the main star in the graduation project of Thibault de Fournas. Titled "From Paper to Screen" this little visual gem is filled with information and walks us through the evolution of typography. Fournas explains the transitional history of animated type in this inventive short film. “Animation which shows typography evolution from paper to screen.

    The animation is divided in two parts. The first deals with the basic rules of typesetting. The second, is about the evolution of typography in cinema.

    Used mainly for Opening and Closing title” notes Thibault de Fournas, cofounder of Parachutes.tv

    FROM PAPER TO SCREEN from Thibault de Fournas on Vimeo.

     

    08Jul
    FromPaperToScreen
  • #TGIIF: The only Instagram account to follow this Friday is @xtianmiller

    "Obsession is a more extreme version of ambition" writes Xtian, an interdisciplinary designer in Detroit with a dream to impact & inspire people through creativity & design. "Without obsession, the well runs dry. You lose interest. You settle for mediocre. Obsession can give you the fuel to persevere through the times you’re feeling unmotivated or tired, and excel when you’re not. You know you’re obsessed about something when it keeps you up at night and you’re think about it at least 298 times a day. If you can’t obsess over what you’re currently working on, maybe it’s not for you.

    Find something you can get obsessed about and you’ll naturally want to improve and become the best at it. It’s that simple. But don’t be a slave to your ambition—have some self-compassion. Understand that obsessions progress and evolve, and most will only pay off over a long period of time" notes Xtian in one of his insightful social media posts. We are obsessed with his Instagram account which is filled with typography and posters to keep us inspired. 

    The British-born Detroit based designer is specializing in UX/UI and he is " been blessed to work with a variety of clients including F500s like FCA, Ford, Lear & Mercedes".

    Having studied Graphic Design Xtian is the former art Director at Moncur & Design Lead at SOtech and he is currently the senior sesigner at Vectorform.

    Founder of Attack The Front; a resource to empower creatives, creator of Notchless & the Emergence plugin and author of revered articles such as "Your Body Text Is Too Small", "How To Brutalize The Web" & more this "interdisciplinary designer, writer, dreamer, creativity & productivity hacktivist", maker of @attackthefront and more is the only Instagrammer to follow this #TGIIF, the latest addition to the Typeroom typographic adventures online. 


    @xtianmiller


    @xtianmiller


    @xtianmiller


    @xtianmiller


    @xtianmiller


    @xtianmiller


    @xtianmiller


    @xtianmiller


    @xtianmiller


    @xtianmiller


    @xtianmiller


    @xtianmiller


    @xtianmiller


    @xtianmiller


    @xtianmiller


    @xtianmiller

    06Jul
  • Why Forgotten Shapes is the nostalgic type foundry you should know

    The past is the present for Forgotten Shapes, a new type foundry with a twist.

    “Forgotten Shapes publishes digital reconstructions of typefaces that have somehow vanished. "We revive such typefaces according to the guiding principle of Werktreue -that is, in a form as faithful to the original as possible” note Stephan, Reymund and Pierre, the creative forces behind FS.

    “Extensive research in archives, museums and libraries builds the foundation to our library of digital reconstructions of typefaces that have somehow vanished. This research and the entire background of each typeface is further made accessible within appropriate articles on our website” adds Forgotten Shapes.

    Enter their typographic adventure beyond space and time here.


    ©Forgotten Shapes. All rights reserved


    ©Forgotten Shapes. All rights reserved


    Private Collection (Stephan Müller), ©Stephan Müller 
    (Found on Forgotten Shapes. All rights reserved)


    Private Collection (Stephan Müller), ©Stephan Müller 
    (Found on Forgotten Shapes. All rights reserved)


    Swiss National Library NL, ©Stephan Müller 
    (Found on Forgotten Shapes. All rights reserved)

    Swiss National Library NL, ©Stephan Müller 
    (Found on Forgotten Shapes. All rights reserved)


    ©Forgotten Shapes. All rights reserved


    Private Collection (Gert Wunderlich), ©Reymund Schröder
    (Found on Forgotten Shapes. All rights reserved)


    Private Collection (Gert Wunderlich), ©Reymund Schröder 
    (Found on Forgotten Shapes. All rights reserved)


    Private Collection (Gert Wunderlich), ©Reymund Schröder 
    (Found on Forgotten Shapes. All rights reserved)


    ©Forgotten Shapes. All rights reserved


    ©Forgotten Shapes. All rights reserved


    ©Forgotten Shapes. All rights reserved


    Stadtgeschichtliches Museum Leipzig [Inv.Nr.Inv.Nr. 1848/49:129/40 Nr.67] ©Pierre Pané-Farré 
    (Found on Forgotten Shapes. All rights reserved)


    ©Special Collections, University of Amsterdam [OTM KVB LPM 1808] 
    (Found on Forgotten Shapes. All rights reserved)


    Stadtgeschichtliches Museum Leipzig [1848/49:129/40 Nr. 70] ©Pierre Pané-Farré 
    (Found on Forgotten Shapes. All rights reserved)


    ©Herwig Kempenaers (Found on Forgotten Shapes. All rights reserved)


    ©Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Columbia University in the City of New York, [Call BOOKART z250.H27 1835] (Found on Forgotten Shapes. All rights reserved)


    ©Special Collections, University of Amsterdam [OTM KVB LPP 140 (1-13)] 
    (Found on Forgotten Shapes. All rights reserved)

    02Jul