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  • From Helvetica Neue to Plex: IBM's latest corporate type family

    IBM knows that "typography is the atomic element of good interface design. It colors the words in our language and shapes their meaning". Replacing Helvetica Neue IBM introduced it's new corporate type family, IBM Plex. This open source type family "should be used by IBMers for all typographical situations, replacing Helvetica Neue, whenever possible".

    Designed by Bold Monday in collaboration with Mike Abbink (Executive Creative Director, Brand Experience and Design, IBM Studios) Plex reflects "IBM’s brand spirit, beliefs and design principles. The new design of the typeface is rooted in the idea of man and machine, and borrows influences from sources such as the IBM logotype and historical typewriter typefaces. The balance of engineering versus design set the principles from which this design was born" reports FormFiftyFive' s Luke Tonge.

    "At this moment the IBM Plex family comprises sans-serif, serif and monospace styles to serve a variety of needs across communications and digital experiences. The sans and the serif are the workhorse families and the monospaced is great for informal communication and for developers to code with. Each branch of the IBM Plex family comes in eight weights with italics. In the future, condensed and several non-Latin script versions will be added to the family".

    Check more here
     

    21Nov
  • This just in! Announcing Stack Awards 2017 winners

    The winners of the third annual Stack Awards were announced in London on Monday 20 November 2017. The annual event celebrates for the third year in a row some of the most exciting independent magazine makers from around the world. Shortlisted publisher gathered at The Queen of Hoxton in London to see the announcement of The Stack Awards 2017 winners.

    The subversive fashion title Buffalo Zine picked up Magazine of the Year, presented by Jeremy Leslie from magCulture. Special congratulations should go to design and crafts magazine MacGuffin for winning both Editor of the Year and Art Director of the Year. Meanwhile Anxy, a new mental health magazine, was named both Launch of the Year and Stack Subscribers’ Choice. Eye magazine’s 8000 unique covers for the current issue won Cover of the Year. Scottish student magazine Crumble was awarded Student Magazine of the Year, and Weapons of Reason picked up Best Use of Illustration.

    Here’s the full list of winning and commended magazines. 

    Magazine Of The Year
    Winner:
    Buffalo Zine (UK)
    Commended:
    Good Trouble (USA)
    Migrant Journal (UK)

    Launch of the Year
    Winner:
    Anxy Magazine (USA)
    Commended:
    Migrant Journal (UK)
    The Move (UK)

    Editor of the Year
    Winner:
    MacGuffin (Netherlands)
    Commended: 
    The Happy Reader (UK)
    Howler (USA)

    Art Director of the Year
    Winner:
    MacGuffin (Netherlands)
    Commended:
    Hello (USA)
    Sabat (UK)

    Cover of the Year
    Winner:
    Eye Magazine (UK)
    Commended:
    Good Trouble (USA)
    Pan and the Dream (USA)

    Best Use of Photography
    Winner:
    Four & Sons (Australia)
    Commended:
    Petrie (UK)
    Victory (USA)

    Best Use of Illustration
    Winner:
    Weapons of Reason (UK)
    Commended:
    Beneficial Shock (UK)
    Oogst (Belgium)

    Best Original Non-Fiction
    Winner:
    Rouleur (UK)
    Commended:
    Even N(USA)
    Scenario (Denmark)

    Best Original Fiction
    Winner:
    Harvard Design Magazine (USA)
    Commended:
    212 (Turkey)
    Zoetrope (USA)

    Student Magazine of the Year 
    Winner:
    Crumble (UK)
    Commended:
    Brasilia (Germany)
    The Tangerine (UK)

    Stack Subscriber's Choice
    Winner:
    Anxy Magazine (USA)
    Commended:
    Racquet (USA)

     

    21Nov
  • In the loop with TEMPLO's typographic #KeepCreating campaign

    An urge to create and be cretive in the form of numerous words surrounding oneself, this is TEMPLO's fresh and fluid experimental campaign for Plymouth College of Art

    "From the first briefing workshop it was clear that the campaign needed to have real cut-through and be as outspoken, visionary and challenging as the college" says TEMPLO.

    "At very the heart of our campaign concept is college's philosophy of ‘the continuum’. The idea that the creative process is always in flux, is ever changing and often comes full circle.  To appeal to the youthful target audience (predominantly 17-18 year olds from the UK and abroad) we created an experimental campaign identity from the college's philosophy in a series of 3D typographic loops. The loops envelop and wrap around the Plymouth College of Art branding, the building and key information.  We carried the continuum concept through into the campaign messaging by connecting the college philosophy to the brand. LIVE. MAKE. KEEPCREATING".

    TEMPLO art directed a photoshoot of current students, alumni and staff to capture the amazing diversity within the college and create a stylised set of images that tie in perfectly with the campaign identity.

    The campaign is already rolling out across national billboards, digital applications (TEMPLO has created animations for Twitter and Instagram which feature animated versions of the typographic loops), events, installations, printed items as well as activist tape, wrist bands and tote bags. Per Creative Review "the number of students taking art and design GCSEs fell to its lowest level since 2000 this year. The number of UK students applying to study art and design at university has also decreased and is down 17,000 from 2016".

    21Nov
  • Signe presents the genius of Ralph Schraivogel in 65 iconic posters

    The iconic Swiss designer Ralph Schraivogel, one of the pure masters of poster design who has been "accused" of spoiling the Swiss grid, is the star in France's National Centre for Graphic Design new exhibition.  
    Unconventional and inspired by Japan, Schraivogel, the graphic designer from Switzerland, is considered as one of the greatest poster designers since the 1990s. Three times laureate of the Chaumont International Posters Competition (1996, 2010, 2017), his posters are part of permanent collections of museums such as MoMA, New York and the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam.

    Ralph Schraivogel has designed books, logos and visual identities, but since his early career he started devellopping designs for cultural events and institutions.

    He has been in charge of visual communication of the Filmpodium cinema since 1983, and he has regularly produced posters for the Museum für Gestaltung of Zürich since 1984.

    "The characteristics of Schraivogel’s work is the observation, the study and the exhaustion of a subject, translated and reinterpreted through image, transforming precision in a great visual power. The graphic work of Ralph Schraivogel is consistent and singular and rare : his annual production is limited to two or three posters which he works through a long process of research and sketches".

    The exhibition presents 65 posters from the contemporary posters collection of le Signe, enriched with loans from the author's personal archives: preparatory works that show the process of creation and the intermediate phases of the creation of a poster.

    Ralph Schraivogel was born in 1960 in Lucerne, Switzerland. He studied graphic design at the Schule für Gestaltung Zürich from 1977 to 1982. After receiving his diploma, he opened his own graphic design studio in Zurich. He designs print media and devotes himself above all to poster design. His posters are part of numerous collections around the world including the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art in New York.

    The exhibition is produced by le Signe National Centre for Graphic Design, and will run from November 10, 2017 — February 4, 2018.

     

    21Nov
  • Alan Long's life-saving book for the designer you love to hate

    "Christmas is a time of compassion and forgiveness, so why not give the gift of seething acceptance this year?" Alan Long's life-saving book ‘How to Live With a Designer Without Killing Them’ has arrived just in time for the office 'Secret Santa’ you completely forgot about.

    Long’s second publication after his debut ‘An A-Z guide to being a freelance designer’ is an ideal addition to the stocking of your beloved "whether you are the designer in question, or their friend/partner gently and passive-aggressively trying to point out what a pain in the bum they are 99.9% of the time".

    "Does noticing colour discrepancies between menus and tablecloths in a restaurant make you want to scratch your eyeballs out of their eyeholes? Does noticing uneven kerning in signage typeface, or a rogue apostrophe, make you do a little sick? When you see a wonky picture on someone’s wall, is the desire to straighten it so strong you stop listening to what they are saying entirely and hear ringing in your ears? No? Then you’re probably not a designer. But you might be unfortunate enough to know one".

    ‘How to Live With a Designer Without Killing Them’ is the perfect antidote to all those moments arguing about the right way to organise the book shelf (by spine colour or author surname or genre), whether the aloe vera really tones in properly with the cheese plant, and whatever other seemingly tedious nonsense you put up with living with a designer - you poor thing.

     

    20Nov